What would a “government shutdown” mean in practical terms?

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This topic contains 76 replies, has 40 voices, and was last updated by Profile photo of Peter Sperry Peter Sperry 3 years, 8 months ago.

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  • #123721

    What elements of the federal government would actually get “shutdown”? What does being “shutdown” really mean? Does it mean all of HUD/DOT/DOE etc would shutdown? Just portions?

    How about DHS, DOD, or Intelligence Community agencies? I don’t imagine the Pentagon would close, TSA would stop screenings, or the CIA would stop doing their work.

    Anyone able to elaborate on this topic?

  • #123874
    Profile photo of Peter Sperry
    Peter Sperry
    Participant

    The Congressional Research Service has a reprot that provides answers on that

    http://www.fas.org/sgp/crs/misc/RL34680.pdf

  • #123872
    Profile photo of Carol Davison
    Carol Davison
    Participant

    What happened during the last shutdown?

    For what length of time would we be off?

    What vounteer/travel activites did people participate in?

  • #123870
    Profile photo of Tarryn Reddy
    Tarryn Reddy
    Participant

    I think a huge concern from federal employees is will they get paid if they are furloughed?

    In the GovExec Article, “Pay is no guarantee for furloughed employees“, they discuss the implications for fed employees pay.

    The last time the government shut down in 1995 and 1996, for 27 days at an overall cost of $1.4 billion, furloughed federal employees were paid retroactively for the time they were off the job. But it’s up to Congress to decide whether to reimburse employees for the time lost, and lawmakers might not be disposed to do so during the current fiscal climate.

  • #123868
    Profile photo of Lisa Roper
    Lisa Roper
    Participant

    The link provided by Peter Sperry is very informative. Thanks Peter!

    So does anyone know if we will still have health insurance coverage?

    Should we file for unemployment if the shutdown continues? In Illinois I could file after 7 days. If Congress did reimburse employees and I filed for unemployment I would assume the State of Illinois would be knocking on my door for me to reimburse them…….

    However……I wonder what would happen if every employee filed for unemployment….wouldn’t that be interesting????

  • #123866

    During the shutdown of ’95-’96 there were lots of very worried federal employees.

    • We were off for three weeks
    • We didn’t know if we would be paid
    • It was the holidays
    • It was winter (In Buffalo, NY for me – think high heating bills and how to pay for them)
    • It was not fun or enjoyable in any way shape or form
    • Travel was not an option (What if the government started back up and we were out of town?). Besides, we were living off our savings, as unemployment hadn’t started yet.)
    • Volunteering was also not an option. We were either taking care of our families and personal business or hitting the streets with informational pickets.

    It they shut down the federal government again, who knows how long we would be off. I also wouldn’t count on getting retroactively paid for the time the government was shut down either.

  • #123864
    Profile photo of Lisa Roper
    Lisa Roper
    Participant

    I’m with you all the way Murrianna. I was around back then as well and freshly divorced.

    It looks like you have the same ideas I do. Who knows how long we will be shutdown or if we will be reimbursed. I would be surprised if they paid us.

  • #123862
    Profile photo of Allen Sheaprd
    Allen Sheaprd
    Participant

    Murrianna, Lisa,

    I agree with both of you. IMO, there would be hell to pay for not paying people retroactivly. Why? its not their fault. They did not ask for nor want nor cause the shutdown.

    I would hope the outcry of “Bail out thousands of GM workers but not tens of thousands of federal workers for a problem congress and the president caused.”

    There are no gurantees. Should people start saving their pennies now?

  • #123860
    Profile photo of Hope OKeeffe
    Hope OKeeffe
    Participant

    How are agencies handling web services — much less social media — in the event of shutdown? This was an area that simply didn’t exist in 95-96…

  • #123858
    Profile photo of kara moller
    kara moller
    Participant

    im more concerned with the prorams I manage – are we really not allowed to talk to them or email while a shut down occurs?

  • #123856
    Profile photo of Ed Albetski
    Ed Albetski
    Participant

    Yes, you really can’t continue to work. It’s more like a lockout. In ’96 our servers were shut down – we could not work from home even if we wished. The loss of productivity would have been considered criminal if the workers initiated the action.

  • #123854

    I agree with Murrianna too. It was not a productive or engaging experience. Yet another reason why young people would avoid a career in government. I disagree on the picketing aspects. Instead of protesting, we should show our dedication by volunteering to help others. This tells a lot more about where our heart is. If the government won’t let us work (Antiddficiency Act), then we should volunteer our services to make help those who are truly in need.

  • #123852
    Profile photo of Tiffany Taylor
    Tiffany Taylor
    Participant

    Does anyone know how soon in advance of the furlough taking affect we would be notified? Are we given a day’s notice or is it more like weather related dismissals, where the word comes down and you just pack up and go on the spot?

  • #123850
    Profile photo of Lisa Roper
    Lisa Roper
    Participant

    You watch the news. If they do not raise the debt ceiling by March 4 we will not report for work on Monday.

  • #123848
    Profile photo of Benjamin Dunlap
    Benjamin Dunlap
    Participant

    I cannot help but wonder, not about volunteering or travel, but about protest.

  • #123846
    Profile photo of GovLoop
    GovLoop
    Keymaster

    Also heard from a few people that the weird thing after the shutdown was that then only had a few months to spend the budget for that year – so in end some people got more training, new projects, etc in end

  • #123844
    Profile photo of Thom Campbell
    Thom Campbell
    Participant

    I’m particularly curious about our contractors. We have a fixed price contract for technical assistance with our grantees. Can the contractor keep working since the funding for the contract has already been obligated?

    And what about our grantees? Will they be able to draw funding down during the shut down?

  • #123842
    Profile photo of Lisa Roper
    Lisa Roper
    Participant

    That thought has crossed my mind as well. I think we are between a rock and a hard place. The public has no sympathy whatsoever for a government employee.

    I am sure they will feel the affect of National Parks and Forests closing.

    It is very frustrating to know they can just shut us down because of their bad management practices and there are absolutely no consequences/accountability.

  • #123840

    Thom,

    Based on all the article I have read, a Fixed Price contract with up-front funding is probably one of the few contracts that would be allowed to continue work. This though, assumes that you still have access to the facility/ies necessary for doing the work, IT systems are still running, and if you require any government approvals or interaction that the government people are available.

    Best to talk to your Contracting Office asap to find out how they think it will work.

  • #123838
    Profile photo of Benjamin Dunlap
    Benjamin Dunlap
    Participant

    As government workers, we have opportunities to present our ROI etc to family and friends but generally not to the public. We rely on the official information offices and out reach of our agencies. To me this seems like a rare opportunity to let people know that we are dedicated to our jobs and to our country and that we are not just sitting around collecting paychecks.

  • #123836
    Profile photo of Tiffany Taylor
    Tiffany Taylor
    Participant

    Thom,

    I was a contractor during the last shutdown. the government facility we worked at was shut down, but we were allowed to work at company headquarters provided we could perform work that was related to the contract, and so we consequently got paid. Many other contractors were not so lucky and did not get paid for the time. I understand that it depends on the type of contract and the specifics of the contract, as well as the interpretation of the contract’s terms by the contracting officer.

  • #123834
    Profile photo of Laura Strohbach
    Laura Strohbach
    Participant

    Because we were scheduled to accept a new building that had been constructed for lease to the Government and failing to inspect and accept it would have been a large breach of contract, I was considered essential and traveled to a very remote area for the inspection. My agency’s headquarters was advised that I would be working.

    My airline ticket had already been paid for and provided to me. When I got to the airport nearest to my final destination which is a 2 hour drive away, I was taken aback to discover that my travel card had been suspended and could not be used to get my CRV nor later used for my hotel. I called the number on the card to see if it could be reinstated, but the person running the program was non-essential and was off. I was fortunate enough to have a personal credit card to cover the cost of the CRV, and the hotel, because I had been staying there each month for about a year allowed me to write a personal check, however, a year before that, I would not have had a credit card with a high enough limit or funds in my bank account to pay for lodging and meals, and I would have been stranded.

    If anyone finds themselves potentially in that position, you should take steps to ensure you are not hung out to dry the way I was.

  • #123832
    Profile photo of Midori Raymore
    Midori Raymore
    Participant

    I have a theory that the reason Congress issued back pay for the FY1996 furloughs was due to state budget conerns. Imagine what it does to a state’s unemployment funds if suddenly all these federal employees claim unemployment benefits? We can potentially bankrupt that state’s unemployment fund in a short amount of time depending on the federal employee population in that state. I think the states pressured Congress to provide relief for their suddenly depleted unemployment programs so that they could continue to provide benefits to those in need after federal employees returned to work. I think, rather than adding funding to state programs, Congress, by providing back pay, made the federal employees responsible for re-paying the state for any paid unemployment benfits. Most of us probably did re-pay and the state had the funds to continue thier programs.

    All I know is that any furlough will be politiical suicide for the current congress. Many of the repulicians lost their seats in the next election after 1996 and it took that party roughly 15 years to regain those seats. Apparently, they did not learn their lesson though since they are considering the furlough thing again. This has such long reaching effect beyond just the federal employee, as it would ripple out to all areas our our economy. It is crazy that they would even think this is a smart way to balance our budget. The cost would be so much higher than any savings that might generate from a federal furlough.

  • #123830

    Here’s an article from GovWin (Deltek) summing up the latest news on the implications of a shutdown.

    Which includes a link to this pretty thorough list of questions.


    Here are some more details from WashTech:

    Contracts paid for with fiscal 2010 money are still in operation, but invoices might be paid late because of a shutdown. The government might owe a little more if the payment is late. Yet the contractor would generally be required to continue working and to bill the government according to the terms of the contract, said Alan Chvotkin, executive vice president and counsel for the Professional Services Council said at today’s conference.

    Contracts providing products and services won’t be affected in the same way despite using fiscal 2011 money.

    And this article from FederalTimes also had a few good nuggets.

    Another good article, from Government Executive:

    Determining employees’ and contractors’ work status also could be based on whether the shutdown is labeled “hard” or “soft.” During a soft shutdown, workers would be told to show up but do nothing productive to carry out the mission, Cooney said. Soft shutdowns are typical when an administration believes a budget compromise is near and it is unnecessary for workers to miss a full day.

    The more likely scenario is a hard shutdown, during which federal and contract workers are furloughed. In this scenario, security guards would block employees from entering their buildings. Workers would be prohibited from volunteering their services and would be advised not to continue working under the false assumption that the financial terms could be worked out later.

    There are a multitude of other factors that would determine if a firm should continue working on a particular contract, said Alan Chvotkin, PSC’s executive vice president and counsel. Fixed-price contracts generally are paid in advance, allowing the company to continue providing the service. Programs with revolving funds that do not rely on congressional appropriations — such as the General Services Administration’s Public Buildings Service — likewise would be exempt from the shutdown.

    But, companies relying on cost-plus and time-and-materials contracts would not be so lucky. Cost-type contracts generally include a “limitations of funds” clause that would serve as a de facto stop on most work, Chvotkin said. Time-and-materials contracts, which are based on incurred costs, also would not be funded. And, while indefinite delivery-indefinite quantity contracts would remain valid, no new orders could be placed. Deadlines for filing bid protests and agency appeals, however, are unlikely to be pushed back because of a shutdown, he said.

  • #123828
    Profile photo of Peter Sperry
    Peter Sperry
    Participant

    OMB Circular A-11 also has some useful guidance.

    SECTION 124—AGENCY OPERATIONS IN THE ABSENCE OF APPROPRIATIONS

    http://www.whitehouse.gov/sites/default/files/omb/assets/a11_current_year/s124.pdf

  • #123826
    Profile photo of Elliot Volkman
    Elliot Volkman
    Participant

    Thanks for posting our piece about the contractors. We are also researching in greater detail how everyone is going to be informed on March 4. I’m going to generate another discussion to see what the buzz is as far as when people will know what happens.

  • #123824
    Profile photo of Joe Loong
    Joe Loong
    Participant

    According to a co-worker whose wife is a govie, her boss told her to come in as normal on Friday the 4th, and would be sent home until further notice. Anyone else get similar guidance from their management?

  • #123822
    Profile photo of Sharyn
    Sharyn
    Participant

    Thank you Christopher – this is really helpful. And depressing.

  • #123820
    Profile photo of Remi
    Remi
    Participant

    There is a conference call today regarding social media—

    Fed Web mgrs council— contact Rachel Flagg rachel.flagg@gsa.gov and Kathy McShea kathleen.mcshea@dhs.gov if you have questions.

    

  • #123818
    Profile photo of Debra L Fryar
    Debra L Fryar
    Participant

    I worked for DOD as a civilian during the last shutdown. We were told we were mission critical and continued work as usual. But there was no guarentee we would be paid.

  • #123816
    Profile photo of dave salman
    dave salman
    Participant

    There was no guarantee that people who worked during the shutdown would be paid? That does not sound possible.

  • #123814
    Profile photo of Allen Sheaprd
    Allen Sheaprd
    Participant

    Terrence,

    Volunteer – now. Yes now. Share our lesson’s learned.

    What would people do in case of a shut down? It should be the same plan incase of being fired. Saving money, cutting back, etc.

    One thing people do not think of is mental health. Keep in contact with govies so no one feels alone. That its only them.

    Second keep in touch with those still working to keep ones spirits up.

    BTW – the first thing taught in survial school is P.M.A. – positive mental attitude. Those who see success find a way. Those who see failure sadly find their way to failure also.

    “We survived ’95 – we will be good in 2011″ Can’t think of anything that rhyms wtih “2011”

  • #123812
    Profile photo of Allen Sheaprd
    Allen Sheaprd
    Participant

    During the last shutdown I too was gov contractor. Two of my databases where considered “quality of life” . We did not shut down – though the building was empty.

    Back in ’95 if my company thought they would not have gotten paid they would have moved me.

    Instead I worked, almost alone, for the three weeks. Cafeteria was shut down. I never thought I would miss that.

  • #123810
    Profile photo of Geri Proctor
    Geri Proctor
    Participant

    I went through the shut down in ’95 and we were told the evening before to call in the morning and see if we were up and running. Our supervisor went into the office and called everyone to not come in. The worst part of it was that it went day by day and we did not know what was going on. There was no reliable information and rumors were flying.

  • #123808

    Kara, in the event of a government shutdown there is no contact with your grantees or program participants. They will be on their own. No phone calls. No emails. No letters. No onsite visits. We do not work in anyway, shape, or form unless we have been deemed essential to the operations of our agency and will be drawing a salary.

  • #123806
    Profile photo of Sterling Bobbitt
    Sterling Bobbitt
    Participant

    One of my favorite wise men, David Gergen, says it so well:

    “All of this has lent enormous uncertainty — and a high degree of drama — to the unfolding tale of a possible government shutdown. But here’s the sad part: in the end, the amount of money being fought over is only a tiny fraction of the nation’s budget deficit. In effect, this episode is a smokescreen, making it seem that lawmakers are really struggling over the deficits when, in truth, they are still dodging debates over the big five in government spending: Medicare, Medicaid, Social Security, defense and taxes. When they do — if they ever do — those will be fights worth having.”

    http://www.nytimes.com/roomfordebate/2011/02/22/how-can-congress-avoid-a-shutdown/the-budget-smokescreen

  • #123804
    Profile photo of Linda Slaght
    Linda Slaght
    Participant

    I remember it like it was yesterday. The worst part for me was all the mocking of federal employees that was going on in the media, and even in my hometown. It was demoralizing.

  • #123802
    Profile photo of Teresa Hughes
    Teresa Hughes
    Participant

    I like your attitude. Volunteering is the perfect response.

  • #123800
    Profile photo of Teresa Hughes
    Teresa Hughes
    Participant

    As an HR benefits assistant, I am also getting questions on the continuation of health care coverage, how to take out a TSP loan (TSP loans are not permitted while in a non pay status), and how to file for unemployment in different states.

  • #123798
    Profile photo of Wendell Black
    Wendell Black
    Participant

    During the 1995-1996 shutdown, I worked as a federal inspector for the Department of the Interior. I was deemed “mission critical” and I had to report to work. I was paid for the time I worked, although my paycheck was delayed slightly (I can’t remember how long it was delayed though)

  • #123796
    Profile photo of Wendell Black
    Wendell Black
    Participant

    I like your theory. :o)

  • #123794
    Profile photo of Michelle
    Michelle
    Participant

    As a new government employee, I’m concerned about my colleagues (contractors) who seem even less likely to receive retroactive pay than we are. Most of them work side by side the “govies” in similar positions.

  • #123792
    Profile photo of Dianne Floyd Sutton
    Dianne Floyd Sutton
    Participant

    For me as an HRD consultant to the government the shut down will mean no revenue is comming in. This will be the third time I have be affected by a federal government shut down (that is if it occurs). It is devastaing to businesses that service the government and it becomes hard to bounce back.

  • #123790
    Profile photo of William Wylie
    William Wylie
    Participant

    I don’t think saying we would “party like it’s 1995″ does much to help our public perception problem.

    That aside the decision on who stays (and who goes) is largely driven by core mission and criticality.

    My segment of the agency anticipates working, but we’re providing a national security function. Most folks are going to be sent home and I reckon it will be about a month before they’re allowed to come back to work.

  • #123788
    Profile photo of William Wylie
    William Wylie
    Participant

    As a general rule the answer is yes.
    Ultimately it’s addressed in the guidance issued by OPM.

    In so far as unemployment is concerned that’s a state by state issue. Some states don’t allow you to file if you’re not immediately available for work…and since the outside employment rules remain in place during the shutdown, some people may be denied unemployment because they CAN’T take another job (and there won’t be anyone around to approve them doing so.)

  • #123786
    Profile photo of William Wylie
    William Wylie
    Participant

    This isn’t the debt ceiling issue (that’s another kettle of fish).

    This is just the CR/budget.

    So we may be doing this dance twice this year.

  • #123784
    Profile photo of William Wylie
    William Wylie
    Participant

    We were told to draft plans to shut down, but to inform all personnel to report to duty unless directed otherwise.

  • #123782
    Profile photo of Teresa Hughes
    Teresa Hughes
    Participant

    Where do you get the month time frame? I wouldn’t begin to guess as to the whether or not we’ll have the furlough and certainly wouldn’t want to panic employees about a possible month without pay or work with just personal conjecture.

  • #123780
    Profile photo of William Wylie
    William Wylie
    Participant

    Last time we did this employees were gone for three weeks (that’s pretty darned close to a month).

    In the end no one can predict, with any degree of accuracy, how much of what the politicians are saying is hot air and how much is sincere belief. Based on the level of acrimony and disdain THIS time around I would say that unless someone has an epiphany, by March 04, 2011 then there’s not much hope for a short shutdown. Much of the incentive to compromise will be off the table at that point because (a) the damage will already have been done; (b) much of the reason for compromise last time (impact to seniors and vets) is being handled by automated processes; (c) the hard liners on the far right of the republican party show no inclination to move away from their position- and Speaker Boehner can’t or won’t budget them; (d) popular sentiment, right now, is STRONGLY anti-government employee and thus there will be little outcry from the people (until the net effect of no government is felt by contractors…which in most cases will take about a month); and (e) a month is long enough to demonstrate intent without endangering the substantial bulk of the proposed cuts.

    Also bear in mind that the government pays in arears, so payments up to and including the 4th will be already processed by COB. You can bet that contractors are going to be counting on that money to get them through, and anything that CAN be invoiced prior to the 4th will be processed and any automated payments approved. It will take two-three weeks for contractors to run through that money and maybe two more weeks more to run through short term reserves. Unless contractors are flush with cash it will be at this point they will begin laying people off. THIS will be the point at which Congress will feel compelled to act, because the public will be upset by the loss of jobs.

  • #123778
    Profile photo of Teresa Hughes
    Teresa Hughes
    Participant

    No offense, but I hope you are wrong in this.

  • #123776
    Profile photo of William Wylie
    William Wylie
    Participant

    I’m not offended. Frankly I would like to be wrong…but it’s not the way I’m betting.

    You should also bear in mind that the far right may seize this opportunity to get their “furlough” of federal employees in without putting it into legislation. So I would say that there’s enough vitriol, brinksmanship, and other agendas to make a month long shutdown a real possibility.

  • #123774
    Profile photo of William Wylie
    William Wylie
    Participant

    That’s not quite accurate.

    People who worked were ALWAYS assured of being paid. They just didn’t know when, so the net result was the same as not being paid during this period (no income coming in until AFTER it was over).

    The people who were off were the ones who were at risk of not getting paid.

  • #123772
    Profile photo of William Wylie
    William Wylie
    Participant

    That’s the answer. If you’re not working your NOT working and the government is prohibited from allowing you to work unpaid.

  • #123770
    Profile photo of William Wylie
    William Wylie
    Participant

    My sense is that Congress will reciss any funds that are surplus to the level of funding they approve.

  • #123768
    Profile photo of William B Ball
    William B Ball
    Participant

    In today’s climate and the confusion by many people about the differences between fed and state workers I am not optimistic that any furloughed time would be reimbursed. That will likely be hammered home by some in the house

    The way that the NSPS conversions were implemented make me believe that the idea is to force some of the 25+ time in service year groups to retire. This move was at the direction of the new administration.

    In other words we are getting squeezed from both sides and have no sympathy or understanding from the public at large.

  • #123766
    Profile photo of Allen Sheaprd
    Allen Sheaprd
    Participant

    While I hope a month is too long I doubt it. The president cancelled a trip to make sure Health care reform was pushed through. I suspect he will not budge

    The last round of elections showed the people wanting change and less government – tea party. Congress should not back down. Hence it could be a long fight.

    What concens me is NPRs report last night that many agencies have not told the public nor their people If they will be closed.

    NPR cited the Social security Admin. While the money for Social Sec. is not up for debate, the people who print and mail the checks are. Back in ’95 they where sent home only to have the Presidnet Clinton call them back in.

    Hence the President has the power to re-open any agency. For onece I hope the IRS stays open.

  • #123764
    Profile photo of Lisa Roper
    Lisa Roper
    Participant

    I think we should all take annual leave next week……ha!

  • #123762
    Profile photo of Teresa Hughes
    Teresa Hughes
    Participant

    Annual leave is cancelled in the case of a government furlough.

  • #123760
    Profile photo of Lisa Roper
    Lisa Roper
    Participant

    Yes but next week we will still be working……

  • #123758
    Profile photo of Tarryn Reddy
    Tarryn Reddy
    Participant

    If government shuts down, bye-bye BlackBerry??

    If Congress forces the government to shut down, then agencies and employees might have to shut down office Web-based e-mail and power off BlackBerrys, according to federal law.


    Full story: http://www.nextgov.com/nextgov/ng_20110223_7883.php?oref=rss?zone=NGtoday

    For how many of you is this your only phone?

  • #123756
    Profile photo of Wendell Black
    Wendell Black
    Participant

    Because I’m with DHS, my agency also has my personal cellphone as well due to our recall action plan.

  • #123754
    Profile photo of Lisa Rein
    Lisa Rein
    Participant

    Dear GovLoopers

    This is Lisa Rein from the Washington Post… I’ve been reading your comments on a shut down from the veterans and it doesn’t sound fun. I’d love to talk more with you guys about this. I’m working on a piece for early next week about what people are thinking and planning and feeling and if yu guys think this really will happen… Next week or even after Congress tries a few times to extend the continuing resolution.

    I’m also anxious to hear what life has been like for feds without a budget these past months… All the uncertainty must be hell but I’ve to know how it plays out.. No travel budget, or what about projects and hires that are on hold? Does it make it hard to get your work done??

    Feel free to write here or email me at Reinl@washpost.com

    And–my phone num is 202-334-5190.

    Thanks. You guys are the best .

    Lisa

  • #123752
    Profile photo of Lisa Rein
    Lisa Rein
    Participant

    Dear GovLoopers

    This is Lisa Rein from the Washington Post… I’ve been reading your comments on a shut down from the veterans and it doesn’t sound fun. I’d love to talk more with you guys about this. I’m working on a piece for early next week about what people are thinking and planning and feeling and if yu guys think this really will happen… Next week or even after Congress tries a few times to extend the continuing resolution.

    I’m also anxious to hear what life has been like for feds without a budget these past months… All the uncertainty must be hell but I’ve to know how it plays out.. No travel budget, or what about projects and hires that are on hold? Does it make it hard to get your work done??

    Feel free to write here or email me at Reinl@washpost.com

    And–my phone num is 202-334-5190.

    Thanks. You guys are the best .

    Lisa

  • #123750
    Profile photo of Richard Wong
    Richard Wong
    Participant

    Some of us were “Trust Fund” babies and had to come into work during the 95-96 furloughs. By that term, I don’t mean we were born independently wealthy, but rather, our agency’s budget was funded by taxes and fees that went into a “trust fund” (e.g., Highway Trust Fund, Airport and Airways Trust Fund), from which our salaries were paid, separate from the general appropriations process. As a matter of fact, about 2,000 DOT employees were furloughed last March when Congress failed to reauthorize the Highway Trust Fund, but nobody outside of the DOT knew about that.

  • #123748
    Profile photo of Teresa Hughes
    Teresa Hughes
    Participant

    http://www.govexec.com/story_page.cfm?articleid=47191&dcn=e_gvet

    There is good practical information on benefits if furloughed in the link above from Government Executive.com

  • #123746
    Profile photo of Melanie Bales
    Melanie Bales
    Participant

    I don’t think PMS or any other government payment system will be working, so the answer to “…will they be able to draw funding down during the shut down?” is no.

    I’m not looking forward to the onslaught of work after we return, nor the possibility of this happening again in September.

  • #123744
    Profile photo of William Wylie
    William Wylie
    Participant

    September? Try two weeks from now…

  • #123742
    Profile photo of Marie Brennan
    Marie Brennan
    Participant

    Check out that CRS report. It is excellent!

  • #123740
    Profile photo of Melanie Bales
    Melanie Bales
    Participant

    Here’s another document that gives a lot of detail to answer our questions regarding a shut-down.

    http://www.opm.gov/furlough/furlough.asp#Furlough Under Adverse Actions Procedures (General)

  • #123738
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    GovLoop
    Keymaster

    Guess we’ll see on the 18th if it actually happens or not

  • #123736
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    Melissia Johnson
    Participant

    No, we received no guidance what so ever. We have not been advised, notified, about anything that might be coming down. Our management keeps us in the dark.

  • #123734
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    GovLoop
    Keymaster

    What do people think is going to happen this Monday? Another extension? Shutdown?

  • #123732
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    Peter Sperry
    Participant

    Extension to April 8th followed by more short term extensions.

  • #123730
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    Alexandra Mims
    Participant

    If anyone is looking for a place to find additional information, http://www.govshutdown.com was recently created by Centre as a comprehensive place for current information.

    Also, as a free service to the contractor community (inside and outside of the Government), Centre is also offering a White Paper which contains background information, the legal guidance to follow in the event of a shutdown and practical information for contractors.

  • #123728
    Profile photo of Rob Rapanut
    Rob Rapanut
    Participant

    I never thought about this particular situation. I think this warrants serious consideration given we’re in the social media realm now…a government shutdown could yield telework heaven! At the end of the day, you cannot really spend or charge government money if it doesn’t exist during a shutdown, even if you worked on your BlackBerry or laptop.

  • #123726
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    William Wylie
    Participant

    Alas, the same is true for the USCP.

  • #123723
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    Lizette Molina
    Participant

    I downloaded the attached 4-page summary from Fedweek.com. It’s pretty straightforward and didn’t tell me anything that I didn’t already know. But I’m posting it here in case it’s of help to others. That website did say this could be distributed widely.

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