Who’s rolling out iPads in their agency?

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This topic contains 32 replies, has 20 voices, and was last updated by Avatar of GovLoop GovLoop 3 years, 7 months ago.

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  • #121895
    Avatar of Terri Jones
    Terri Jones
    Participant

    Lots of press about iPads usage in business, but what is government doing?

  • #121959
    Avatar of GovLoop
    GovLoop
    Keymaster

    Well I was at FCG event yesterday and amongst 200 mostly feds I saw about 10 iPads in action.

  • #121957
    Avatar of Nicholas Charney
    Nicholas Charney
    Participant
  • #121955
    Avatar of Stephen Peteritas
    Stephen Peteritas
    Participant

    I roll with my ipad everywhere!

  • #121953
    Avatar of Terri Jones
    Terri Jones
    Participant

    Nicholas,

    That is a great picture! I love my iPad and my company is rolling out an iPad app so that you can link it to your OnBase document management system. I have seen many judges using iPads and I am starting to see city councilors using them for accessing documents during the meetings and as laptop replacements. Since they are as cheap as a laptop but easier to carry, I expect it to grow.Thanks for the link!

  • #121951
    Avatar of Terri Jones
    Terri Jones
    Participant

    Me too! I used to carry a Mac laptop and my work Windows machine (I do government ECM solutions), now I save my shoulders and it is faster and easier to use. I use DropBox and Evernote. I am testing the new Microsoft OneNote app to see if I can span platforms for my note taking. Thanks!

  • #121949
    Avatar of Wendy Reynolds
    Wendy Reynolds
    Participant

    Given security concerns, we’re holding fire. Waiting for the RIM Playbook, which will likely address some of those worries.

  • #121947
    Avatar of Kate Hoving
    Kate Hoving
    Participant

    The City of Williamsburg started using iPads July 2010 for City Council and key staff. Staff pay half the cost for each. Save more than $2,000 per year just from not printing council agendas and packets. It’s also part of our larger green government effort. We got a lot of great press — USA Today and CNN. Our mayor gave back his city-issued laptop to use the iPad exclusively. One question that came up was transparency, and we’ve made it clear that as with any other communications, anything on the iPad is FOIA-able.

  • #121945
    Avatar of Sonny Hashmi
    Sonny Hashmi
    Participant

    GSA is very interested in diverse endpoints and several pilot programs are underway include #iPads in the org. We are making good progress and lots of progress in the area of management, security and remote access. I have stopped carrying my laptop for most days. Still some ways to go in FIPS 140-2 compliance and CAC integration. Especially with technologies like native VPN support, Citrix receiver app, and many other useful business friendly apps including mobile dashboards, collaboration tools and document management tools, the iPads, as well as other similar platforms like Android and Blackberry playbook seem to offer real, tangible business productivity benefits.

    Diverse end points and mobile platforms are here to stay and organizations are going to get great value from their platforms in enabling a diverse and mobile workforce, green business, telework, knowledge management, hyper connectivity and many other such related outcomes. CIOs should dedicate effort to test and validate these platforms for their enterprises for effective address this trend based on business needs.

    Quick comment on Blackberry playbook. Counter to popular belief, the playbook is based on QNX, not blackberry OS, and requires a separate C&A and 140-2 compliance effort. Just because its blackberry doesn’t automatically bless it for your enterprise. Pay close attention and devote time in testing the platform. We are doing the same.

  • #121943
    Avatar of Terri Jones
    Terri Jones
    Participant

    Thanks for the reply and the info on the Blackberry tablet, I had heard something similar. I am traveling with just my iPad for my personal work and blogging and have been fine. I will be buying the next generation!

  • #121941
    Avatar of Terri Jones
    Terri Jones
    Participant

    This is a great idea, I like the cost sharing part and the green aspect. Thanks for the reply. At Hyland, we have iPad app so that if folks are using our document management software, they can access the document repository from an iPad and they can do workflow work. This is a great boon to council meetings and I think it really helps staff when you want them in the field or really engaged with your constituent service. Thanks!

  • #121939
    Avatar of Jolie Lee
    Jolie Lee
    Participant

    We have an interview on Federal News Radio with Deloitte: iPad to transform the federal workplace.

    One of the big questions is, Will the iPad replace your PC at work? Hint: cloud computing plays a big role.

    Also, we link back to this blog post. Cheers!

  • #121937
    Avatar of Bill Jones
    Bill Jones
    Participant

    The elected officials in the Ciy of Loganville are usingnthe iPads during meetings to access documents and review City codes on the spot. They are working great and our officials like the reduction in paper.

  • #121935
    Avatar of Cheryl Ward
    Cheryl Ward
    Participant

    Isn’t anyone in federal government concerned about violating the Trade Act Agreement? isnt iPAD totally manufactured in China?

  • #121933
    Avatar of Tricia
    Tricia
    Participant

    @Cheryl – Wondering the same thing about how it’s manufactured after hearing a news story about Apple’s iPhoneadding $1.9 billion a year to the U.S. trade deficit with China. Hope those making the decision have truly thought things through… keeping my fingers crossed!

  • #121931
    Avatar of Terri Jones
    Terri Jones
    Participant

    This sounds very interesting, I look forward to reading about it.

  • #121929
    Avatar of Robert Bagwill
    Robert Bagwill
    Participant

    Wouldn’t that only apply to an agency-wide purchase that exceeded the BAA/TAA thresholds?

  • #121927
    Avatar of Cheryl Ward
    Cheryl Ward
    Participant

    I am sure that works for the pilots that are going on, but enterprise adoption will require more than that.

  • #121925
    Avatar of Cheryl Ward
    Cheryl Ward
    Participant

    Actually, I think that TAA is often looked over for smaller buys and Small Business buys, but when you see feds with the tools in hand all over public events, it becomes much more difficult for the overseers to turn a blind eye. Somebody is likely to find themselves in an uncomfortable spotlight with a lot of ‘splainin’ to do….

  • #121923
    Avatar of Marc Dronen
    Marc Dronen
    Participant

    We are taking a hard look at outfitting our customer care agents with iPads to make them much more flexible to be mobilized in various environments when the need arises and taking further opportunity to the City’s wi-fi system. As a related note, there is some renewed interest in redesigning our information services to operate over a cloud system. I would be interested if anyone knows of a success in outfitting iPads in an outdoor distributed field environment.

  • #121921
    Avatar of GovLoop
    GovLoop
    Keymaster

    What’s the trade act agreement? How does that apply to the current purchases gov’t makes like Dell/Gateway computers (are those actually manufactured in U.S. – I’d guess China)

  • #121919
    Avatar of Charlie Schwartz
    Charlie Schwartz
    Participant

    I would be surprised if there weren’t a ton of compatibility issues with iPads and outdated XP software? Wouldn’t a Windows tablet or Android tablet make more sense? I don’t know if Windows tablets allow reading of barcodes, but that’s something that’s becoming very popular and might make sense as far as moving to Android as an OS for portable devices.

  • #121917
    Avatar of GovLoop
    GovLoop
    Keymaster

    Looks like folks in Air Force Special Ops Unit will access flight info and manuals on the iPad now

    http://www.informationweek.com/news/government/mobile/232301376?cid=RSSfeed_IWK_Government

  • #121915
    Avatar of Denise Petet
    Denise Petet
    Participant

    As someone that has an iPad I will say that they are great for those that consume data. Reading books, agendas, reports,etc. Slim, fast, relatively virus proof (iOS5 is separate from any other operating system and as of right now there are no known virus with the iPad…although I’m sure that’ll change eventually). They’re instant on/instant off and can go for days without needing to be charged.

    They’re not so great for those that CREATE content however. many iPad apps are skinnier than their pc/mac counterparts, and while they have basic functionality, they don’t have all the bells and whistles. For example a word processing program that lets you bold, italicize, put in a few bullet points but nothing ‘fancy’. TO be fair however, most of what they allow you to do is what most people do.

    You also have limited capacity, no more than 64 gig, while for that same price point, 799, you can get a good laptop with hundreds of gigs.

    I have issues with backing up over the cloud. I’ve personally dealt with the cloud ‘eating’ all my contacts. Poof, they were all gone and I had to rebuild. So while it exists, it’s buggy. I have chosen not to use it, not just because of my experience, but also I have issues with allowing some third party to have my data and protect it…I don’t trust them, not to mention any data gathering location is a hacker magnet. My own paranoia :) HOwever in the scope of the government and all the data that can be on their units, there could be some very sensitive stuff out there.

    There’s also a lack of upgradability…you can’ t add memory to an iPad. And you are totally tied to one retailer – apple – and their app store…and what they choose/don’t choose to allow in there.

    Apple has a bad habit of limiting functionality on a whim. FOr example, a year or so ago you could use the camera connection kit and plug almost any USB device – via the camera connection kit – in and use it to gain extra storage…then they decided to limit that for reasons only they know. There was another massive kerflulffle a few months ago when the iOS5 operating system had major battery issues…so have too many people on the same device and you open things up to one programming error effecting tons of people.

    THere are also apps on the iPad that you are not allowed to uninstall. Facetime, newsstand, gamecenter etc…I don’t want then, dont’ use them, but I can’t take them off. You are also not able to password protect your e-mail. You can have a lock code on the device in general. You can use webmail only and use a password for that, but the e-mail app itself is not lockable. There is also only so much content control you have. Many schools and parents have bemoaned their inability to control what the kids have access to or can change.

    Don’t get me wrong, I love my iPad. It’s a great tool and there are things out there that help with its functionality, like the zaggfolio that basically makes your iPad into a small laptop with the addition of an external keyboard. But there are also limitations. I’ve found some great apps that work quite well (documents to go interfaces with your computer and you can even wirelessly sync documents without going through iTunes). But there’s also things out there that don’t work. ANy flash based websites will be off limits. Flash is not nor will it ever be on the iPad. (and Adobe has ceased production on mobile versions). Java also has a ‘sometimes it works’ level of functionality on sites. And there are other issues with mobile safari not totally working with some sites.

    It’s good, it has its uses and it holds the promise of a future where something like the iPad will have fantastic functionality and probably be as good as a home PC.

    So I think for data consumption, reading of reports etc, they’re fine. But they’re not going to replace a laptop anytime soon. they lack ‘oomph’, they lack security and they lack content control.

  • #121913
    Avatar of Julie Chase
    Julie Chase
    Participant

    Surely you jest~~~ ipads??? i.e. wireless? It’s just a dream. Hey, but we got Windows XP, IE7, Office 2007, new flat screen monitors for our desk tops. We’ll catch up someday with the rest of the folks in DC.

  • #121911

    Ya’ll are going to make me cry. I’m stuck with this piece of tech: https://p.twimg.com/Aiav6MRCQAArcyx.jpg

    It’s a 14 year old phone system that the state is too broke to replace. The technician described it as “vintage” and I have to order special parts every time it breaks. The company that made it doesn’t exist even anymore!

  • #121909
    Avatar of Kanika Tolver
    Kanika Tolver
    Participant

    My ipad2 is with me at work…..

  • #121907
    Avatar of Corey McCarren
    Corey McCarren
    Participant

    For the government worker on the go, a tablet can be very useful as long as it doesn’t become a distraction at work. No Angry Birds during your 9-5! Also, unless the government agency has standard issued phones, the workers should have a choice of tablet around the same price range, as long as it also has strong security. I have an Android phone, and I’d rather have an Android tablet because its easier to sync to my phone, though Android may not have the required security. It would have been an easy choice in the days that Blackberry’s ruled the world, the Playbook would be standard.

  • #121905
    Avatar of Julie Chase
    Julie Chase
    Participant

    I don’t want to misunderstand you, but do you use “your” personal phone for gov work? And would you purchase (on your own) a tablet and use it for work? If so, I have to ask, “why”? In my small corner of the world, to rate a Blackberry, you have have double numbers at the end of your GS “AND” you have to be in a supervisory role. If not, too bad. I wouldn’t sync my “personal, bought and paid for by me”, phone, IPAD, laptop to anything on a government/work network. I do know that our NMCI NexGen, or whatever it calls itself nowdays does not allow “syncing”, or “plugging into” any gov operated computer. I am at a loss how to explain how the rest of the government has gone buck wild with IT, and our little section of DoD is still afraid of the boogey-man.

  • #121903
    Avatar of Corey McCarren
    Corey McCarren
    Participant

    I currently am a Fellow here at GovLoop, so I don’t actually work in government. My experience as a recent graduate was first at a start-up science laboratory in which I used my phone for work-related items. I suppose it depends on the organizational structure and private Vs public. I personally wouldn’t mind the option of using my own tablet for work if I wanted to, but I don’t like it being mandatory unless it’s paid for by the organization. As far as “why?”, even if it’s not required I may find myself productive when I have certain tools, though I don’t know if I’d ever actually purchase a tablet, I’m happy with my laptop and phone when I’m on the go. Also, virtual keyboards are not my cup of tea.

    My biggest concern as far as a personal phone/tablet for government work be security. Security is important for a lot of government work, but at the same time I don’t want IT people going through my personal information. Some people save all of their passwords, even credit information on their personal phone/tablet.

  • #121901
    Avatar of Allison Primack
    Allison Primack
    Participant

    When this topic was posted to GovLoop’s Facebook, it received these responses:

    Lovisa Williams We are. W also have a policy on their use. Not just restricted to iPads but all tablet devices, Kindles and other mobile devices with WiFi capabilities :-)

    Nancy B. Sternberg We have over 250 iPads as well as some other devices rolled out within USGS. They are very well received.

  • #121899
    Avatar of Julie Chase
    Julie Chase
    Participant

    Good point Cheryl. Here’s how Uncle Sam gets out of that “sticky” situation. I am a gov credit card holder. I am not allowed to purchase anything that is on the TAA……or not on the CCR or from China or other countries we are not friendly with. However, a “contractor” can buy from China all day long. Example: NMCI, for the worst part is our IT “contractor”. They are free to purchase whatever, where ever. There are several NISH contractors where we are allowed to purchase items with a gov credit card, and yes, some of their products are made in China. DoDEmall has recently pulled all the OPEN MARKET items (which are usually made in China), so that USA goods (and USA’s friends) can be purchased. GSA Advantage has not moved to that as of yet, we are not allowed to buy Office Supplies from them, even though their supplies are the lowest cost of any mandatory source. Basically, Uncle Sam wipes his hands clean by “contracting out” IT. Not rocket science, just look around the office at items purchased by contractors. Our old telephones were made in China. Then again, we didn’t buy them with gov funds.

  • #121897
    Avatar of Julie Chase
    Julie Chase
    Participant

    hey govloop, you’re catching on. The Dells are supplied by a “contractor”. They can buy from whomever they want.

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