Posts Tagged: senate

How a Machine Knew When a Democrat Started Voting With the Republicans

“Retaking the Senate” seems a strange goal for a party that already holds 32 of 63 state Senate seats. In New York, however, that’s exactly what the Democratic Party wants to do. Last year, five state Senators, after running as Democrats, decided to break away from the Democratic caucus and to share power with the… Read more »

The Senate Has Raised The Debt Limit. Now What?

Congress has avoided going over yet another fiscal cliff, with the House passing a “clean” debt limit bill yesterday, and Senate passage happened today. This marks the fourth major piece of bipartisan legislation passed since last October’s 16-day government shutdown that includes the two-year Ryan-Murray budget agreement, the FY14 omnibus appropriations bill, and the extension… Read more »

The United States Congress: Myths and Facts

Too many Americans don’t know what Congress is, or how it works. Congress has most of the political power in the United States. Public support for Congress has reached another all-time low. Our disapproval should be based in reality, not in fantasy, rumor, or ignorance. Our schools don’t bother to teach this stuff. What’s a… Read more »

The Outlook for Discretionary Spending

I’ve been closely following the federal budget for more than two decades, and at no point have things been more confusing, not only to observers like myself, but more importantly to federal managers and executives who are trying to plan their department budgets. A grand bargain on the budget would be welcome news not only… Read more »

16 House Lawmakers to Renew East Coast Missile Site Push

Sixteen Republicans on the House Armed Services Committee want Appropriations Defense subcommittee Chairman Bill Young (R-Fla.) to add $250 million to the fiscal year 2014 defense spending bill for a missile site on the East Coast, The Hill newspaper reports. Jeremy Herb writes the House and Senate Armed Services panels are set to mark up… Read more »

Funding the Government: What’s Moving and What’s Not

Originally posted at the Government Affairs Institute The continuing resolution (CR) that passed in the House on March 6 was expected to easily pass in the Senate last week (wait a minute; did I just say “easily pass in the Senate”?). Both bills would fund the government at sequester level spending through September 30. The… Read more »

Congress on Course to Extend Expiring Continuing Resolution

Originally posted at The Government Affairs Institute Both chambers remain on course to pass a largely uncontroversial extension of the expiring continuing resolution (CR) that will be comprised of an omnibus and probably five out of the 12 individual appropriations bills. It will set FY13 discretionary spending at $984b, equal to the sequester level, but… Read more »

Tracking the Sequester: Jockeying Between House and Senate

Originally blogged at Government Affairs Institute With nine days to go, hope of averting the March 1 sequester continues to fade, with each side drawing a line in the sand, and little reason to believe that their differences can be breached any time soon. Last week the President again went on record demanding that any… Read more »

“They” are the problem, “it’s them,” am I right?

“We the People …” is perhaps the most powerful opening clause ever uttered on this planet. Yet how many of “We,” really take to heart what those three words mean on a personal level? When it comes to the state of civic participation in the United States today, to paraphrase Jimmy Buffett perhaps, “We are… Read more »

Political Leaders (Sort of) Address Changing Face of Government Business

Last month, I had the pleasure of attending a Tech Town Hall hosted by the Northern Virginia Technology Council (NVTC) and Microsoft. The event brought together Virginia U.S. Senate candidates George Allen and Tim Kaine, along with a number of business leaders like Jim Sheaffer, President, North American Sector, CSC; Dendy Young, Managing Partner, McLean… Read more »