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#103110

Denise Petet
Participant

I have a supervisor that micromanages. To the point that you, as an adult, feel like you’re being treated like an incompetent child as you are grilled if you did this or did that or did this or checked on that. And I’m like ‘you know, i was doing this job before you were hired and you couldn’t even do my job, so how about you trust me and respect me and let me do it?’

There’s no one answer. Sometimes a simple ‘here’s the goal, here’s the guidelines, here’s the rules, get it done’ is enough. For others, they need constant prodding and input.

However, on the downside of micromanaging, you end up with a bunch of employees that either resent the heck out of you or are so stifled and stymied that they don’t grow at all and what you’ll get are the mediocre ones staying and the good ones – the ones that can lead – leaving for greener pastures where they feel respected. If you’re obsessed with making sure everyone is working FOR you, few will be able to work WITH you.

So if you’re a micromanager that likes to be ‘large and in charge’ that’s great. If you ever want to be able to take a day off and not worry about the employees doing their jobs without your ‘input’ then you better give them some leash and let them run.

In many ways, a manger’s job is to mentor and tutor employees to eventually fill his/her job – while they get their own jobs done. If you hands off too much, you don’t mentor, if you micromanage you don’t mentor, you stifle.

As to the appointee situation, yeah, that is an issue. Because, quite often, the appointee only has a passing knowledge of what they’re managing, but often feels the need to look and sound competent. And most of them lack the strength of character to admit ‘hey, i’m just an appointee’ and find a good second in command that actually knows the job who can run the place.

I think, if the work is getting done, things are accounted for and no one is taking advantage, you can hands of manage…but if the opposite is true, better earn your paycheck and do the job you’ve been appointed to or hired for.