A Line Drawn In The Sand — What can we learn from Jim Riggleman’s resignation that have implications for organizational development?

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    Ken Boxer
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    ASK KEN

    This weeks question was regarding a Washington, DC news story:

    In a surprise move, Jim Riggleman resigned as manager of the Washington Nationals on Thursday. The resignation came immediately after the Nationals completed a sweep against the Seattle Mariners. For more on this event please read the full article: Jim Riggleman’s Shocking Resignation

    The question: “What can we learn from Jim Riggleman’s resignation that have implications for organizational development?” Please take a moment to read Ken’s answer below and share any additional insights or questions you may have.

    A Few Lessons Learned
    Very few people in Washington, DC resign over principle and many would say it is very difficult to fire people. While I don’t know the intricacies of what actually happened, I think there are some lessons from Jim Riggleman’s resignation that we can all learn.

    Whether we are managers or frontline professionals, what follows is a list of specific lessons I think we can learn from this event, including:

    1. Management needs to take employee concerns seriously
    2. People don’t leave jobs they leave managers. Therefore it is one of the most important jobs of the manager to make his/her employees feel wanted and valued
    3. While sometimes uncomfortable, managers do need to engage employees in conversations about their current performance and their long term career plans
    4. Managers need to recognize accomplishments and progress that employees have made
    5. It is important not to underestimate coaches on the performance of any team
    6. Backing your boss into a corner is never a good idea
    7. Every manager needs to think about the impact of people leaving, not only for the individual leaving but also on those who remain with the organization
    8. Every employee needs to carefully weigh the appropriate time to have important conversations with his/her manager
    9. First, we all need to do our job well and provide value to our organizations by delivering results. Then, appropriate contract negotiations can be sought.
    10. We all need to examine why we work and what are the values that are most important to us. If there is a misalignment of values, the job is not a right fit

    Your Thoughts?

    • How do you show your employees you value them?
    • In what ways do you contribute to the value of your organization?

    Next Week’s Question
    Questions are a powerful way to facilitate learning

    What questions do you have for next week on how to more effectively?

    • Engage and retain top talent
    • Develop leaders
    • Manage organization change

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