BAD KITTY!!! Government Studies Bird Deaths

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This topic contains 1 reply, has 1 voice, and was last updated by  Big Picture Inc 6 years, 10 months ago.

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  • #123259

    Candace Riddle
    Participant

    Remember those thousands of birds that turned up dead in early January? Well according to the government it wasn’t a conspiracy, it wasn’t pesticides…but it was the human’s fault…Oh, and P.S. – Your furry feline friend has been a really bad kitty.

    Nationally, domestic and feral cats kill hundreds of millions of birds each year, according to the government. One study done in Wisconsin found that domestic rural cats alone (thus excluding a large number of suburban and urban cats) killed roughly 39 million birds a year.

    Check out the whole New York Times story here.

  • #123261

    Big Picture Inc
    Participant

    Hahaha I love my kitty – she’s always showing off her prowess. We tried to put a bell on her to warn other creatures (bunnies, snakes, lizards, owls, hummingbirds, all birds, insects, other cats, and even dogs), but that doesn’t stop her!

    Even with a battalion of crafty kitties like mine, I don’t think cats alone are responsible for the mass bird deaths – there would also have to be mass bird presents on the porch if it was (just kidding).

    Seriously though, that NYTimes article mentions various ways birds die annually, but it doesn’t mention why such an unusually high number of birds were/are dying in a relatively short time period in different locations. I remember the USDA being involved with the South Dakota bird deaths (link here), but I don’t know about the other states. It reminds me of stories my great uncles would tell about crop dusting farms with old planes and how they would accidentally kill all the chickens on the farm by flying a little too low. For now it seems safe to assume that there isn’t a bird-killing baron, and the birds aren’t dying inexplicably like the poor honey/Bumble bees. Thanks for sharing!

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