CONTEST – What is Your Gov 2.0 Best Practice?

Home Forums Miscellaneous CONTEST – What is Your Gov 2.0 Best Practice?

This topic contains 16 replies, has 14 voices, and was last updated by  Jenn Specketer 9 years ago.

  • Author
    Posts
  • #78290

    Steve Ressler
    Keymaster

    New contest – starting today, Wed, August 18th….

    GovLoop has teamed with the fine folks at Potomac Forum to ask “What Is Your Gov 2.0 Best Practice?

    The first 10 responses get a free pass to the Potomac Forum Gov 2.0 Best Practice Symposium being held August 26th and 27th in Washington, DC.

    So…what’s your gov 2.0 best practice?

    Mine – Find discrete business problem. Quick, discrete solution. Beta.

  • #78322

    Jenn Specketer
    Participant

    Providing enough information and guidance to your user community on gov 2.0 technology so that IT, Security, Leadership, etc… start to understand the issues around social media are mostly people and policy/guidance/training issues – not technology issues.

  • #78320

    Andrea Baker
    Participant

    If you want to know my best practice you gotta win this contest or already be coming to the Potomac Forum. See you there!

  • #78318

    Elvis Oxley
    Participant

    My best practice, like my politics, is “do it myself”, so I built http://www.insidelobbying.com on a shoestring through a university colleague. Bam, there we were educating thousands of trade association fly-in folks monthly.

  • #78316

    Robin Paoli
    Participant

    Mine is consistency with the public. Even when guidelines change, we can be consistent in our communications and the application of transparency and data / knowledge sharing.

  • #78314

    Bob Carey
    Participant

    For us, the mere fact that we started social network tools is our best practice. We are somewhat unique amongst many federal agencies in that we have numerous individual customers and government customers, as we support more than six million military and overseas voters and more than 7,500 election jurisdictions. We have multiple deadlines, processes, and information pushes that we have to get out to both sets of customers, so tools like Twitter and Facebook are providing us a real opportunity to provide support direct to these customers, instead of having to perpetuate a 1950s model of voting assistance officers providing limited, and error-prone, assistance to the customers.

    We’ll see how this turns out in the next election cycle as we are just starting this process, but we think it will substantially improve our assistance and voter success rates.

    Bob Carey
    Director
    Federal Voting Assistance Program

  • #78312

    Jonathan Rick
    Participant

    It seems everyone these days wants a blog. But blogging–writing, managing, and promoting–is laborious, time-intensive work. Anyone can swing a baseball bat; very few can hit pitches.

    To wit: When considering a blog, ask the following questions:

    1. How many people on your staff can write well?

    2. Can they write for the Web—with links and pictures and blockquotes, etc.?

    3. Do you trust these people to publish what they write, or must everything first be approved by another department?

    4. Will managers give these people sufficient time to blog?

    5. Is there a single person, either on staff or who you can hire, who can serve as the blog’s editor?

    6. What niche will the blog satisfy? (In other words, why will people want to read it?) If the niche is already filled, how will your blog be better?

  • #78310

    Cathey Daniels
    Participant

    Ensuring senior staff is well educated on Web 2 issues — many folks at the lower levels are ready and willing to try. Get senior staff up to speed and the job of implementing a fast track social medial campaign is much smoother.

  • #78308

    Bill
    Participant

    Spending money

  • #78306

    Jonathan Rick
    Participant

    @Bill: Excellent point. Social media, while relatively inexpensive, still requires an investment of both time and money.

  • #78304

    Lauren Modeen
    Participant

    *As you start to grow your network and collaborate through the reaches of Gov 2.0 – take the time to meet individuals in person and begin to interact on a more personal level so that the idea generation can proliferate. Get out, talk to people, challenge their ideas and yours and get below the surface. No matter what technologies we have in place, never let this be a substitute for real one on one collaboration.

    *Constantly think outside the box. It is easy to ride the wave of ideas from others, especially with the viral hype of social media. Get creative on your own.

  • #78302

    Katherine Roland
    Participant

    We’ve found social media to be a great way to build and maintain relationships with our constituents. Be honest and active in your communications. Social media can be a great customer service and community relations tool.

  • #78300

    Nikki Sutton
    Participant

    Use GoToWebinar.com for online trainings and workshops. This is a great way to give the public inside access to the information coming from your agency. For example, we have used webinars successfully when teaching people how to apply for government grants.

  • #78298

    Steve Ressler
    Keymaster

    Great idea. Sending out the conference passes to selected members shortly.

  • #78296

    Phil Sammon
    Participant

    I keep my email inbox as empty as possible: I either delete, answer or file as necessary right away. Download attachments if you need or delete to keep your inbox well below the limited size and keep control of the info that gets dumped on you.

  • #78294

    Amanda Blount
    Participant

    1. I use the interent everyday to look up information for work. I find that if I have a question, I can find the answer on the internet. There is always someone who has encountered what you are dealing with, so why take the hours and hours to find the answer. Google is my best friend. BUT – there are serious manners on the internet that need to be followed. A user should share knowledge as often as they search it. No one should just take from the masses, they should help keep the internet knowledge alive by giving back.

    2. Clear, concise, up to date information. Communication, communication, communication.

  • #78292

    Steve Ressler
    Keymaster

    I like this…no unfunded directives 🙂

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.