Current State of BYOD: Infographic & Qs

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This topic contains 6 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  [email protected] 5 years, 3 months ago.

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  • #179157

    David B. Grinberg
    Participant

    The infographic below on the current state of Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) is from WebRoot.

    QUESTIONS

    1) How is BYOD progressing at your agency?

    2) Are your managers/supervisors embracing or rejecting BYOD?

    3) What’s your preferred device for BYOD?

    3) Should BYOD be mandatory for federal executives (GS-13 & up)?

    4) What are still the biggest hurdles for gov-wide adoption of BYOD?

  • #179169

    [email protected]
    Participant

    1) How is BYOD progressing at your agency?
    A: Slowly at best. To put this in perspective, we just received new BlackBerries that replaced one-year-old BlackBerries, which mine has sat in my desk for the last year.
    2) Are your managers/supervisors embracing or rejecting BYOD?
    A: I would say 50/50. Some managers do embrace and point employees to sign up for the ‘Good for Enterprise’ service that is endorsed by our IT Department. However, there are those who are averse to change and want two separate devices at the end of the day to separate their work and personal lives.
    3) What’s your preferred device for BYOD?
    A: iPhone (iOS)
    3) Should BYOD be mandatory for federal executives (GS-13 & up)?
    A: Why not? Let’s have the discussion and conversation and see how that would be received. Sounds pretty innovative and cost effective to me.
    4) What are still the biggest hurdles for gov-wide adoption of BYOD?
    A: Culture and different mindsets of generations at the office. Again, there are the outliers to consider, but until endorsement happens from the top, the idea and cost savings to be realized will never come to pass. I am optimistic however and see in the next five years, we will have to have this discussion given the current fiscal challenges in gov’t today.

  • #179167

    Henry Brown
    Participant

    Excellent presentation regarding the private sector, I would really be curious to see a similiar infographic for the public sector(primarily federal but…)

  • #179165

    David B. Grinberg
    Participant

    Steven, thanks very much for your comprehensive reply and insightful perspective. A few thoughts…

    1) Why weren’t you using the one-year old BlackBerry — personal reasons, IT issues/professional reasons, or both? I’m curious because I still use a gov-issued Blackberry on a regular basis, even though my agency has a leading BYOD program.

    2) First, the top managers in my office use BYOD, as well as division supervisors and others. I think those who like BYOD should use it. Second, I think gov agencies should also offer the option of issuing a smart-device — other than BlackBerries — to those who don’t own a smartphone or tablet, as well as to those who choose to opt out of BYOD for personal reasons.

    3) I agree that smart-devices should be issued to all gov execs that need them — and who may choose to opt out of the BYOD program and/or need the device to engage in BYOD.

    4) I agree that agency leadership should endorse such programs, as they deem appropriate. That message would then trickle down to managers, supervisors and employees. Leadership starts at the top and sets the example agency-wide.

    Thanks again, Steven for sharing your valuable insights.

  • #179163

    David B. Grinberg
    Participant

    I agree, Henry, that it would be nice to have a similar gov-wide infographic for feds.

    However, I doubt that will happen any time soon because many agencies have neither endorsed nor adopted BYOD, and/or are still in the experimentation and implementation phases.

    Perhaps an enterprising fed employee, agency, WH, OMB, or private org will consider preparing such an infographic based on available data showing costs versus benefits and money saved.

    Perhaps GovLoop would consider creating such an infographic?

    Either way, such an infographic for feds would likely help drive further adoption of BYOD gov-wide.

  • #179161

    David B. Grinberg
    Participant
  • #179159

    [email protected]
    Participant

    I guess my response to Q1 would be because I was using my own device and IT did not want to ‘take back’ the IT property from me. Not sure why but they said it was assigned to me, so I held onto it (and the one I currently have). To the second point, if we captured excess IT property and used more of a pull system instead of a push system to deliver IT hardware to personnel, that might help alleviate unnecessary equipment from being assigned arbitrarily instead of actually fulfilling a need. Again, an opt-out policy would be good, but you have to have a way to negotiate the service and hardware contracts up front and tell the vendors that the amount of devices will be dynamic and not order a set amount, such as a flat 10000 devices ‘just because’. Awesome discussion and I hope this continues.

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