Feds with disabilities at 32-year high, OPM says in new report

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This topic contains 3 replies, has 2 voices, and was last updated by  David B. Grinberg 4 years, 9 months ago.

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  • #181193

    David B. Grinberg
    Participant

    The following OPM News Release was issued today…

    OPM Details Great Strides in Hiring People with Disabilities
    Share of New Hires Is Highest in 32 Years

    The U.S. Office of Personnel Management (OPM) announced that in Fiscal Year (FY) 2012, people with disabilities were hired at a higher percentage than at any point in the past 32 years.

    Additionally, people with targeted disabilities were hired at a higher percentage than at any time in the past 17 years.

    • This success has also led to more people with disabilities serving in federal service than at any time in the past 32 years.

    “People with disabilities are a vital part of the federal workforce, as we are better able to serve the American people because of the talents and experience they bring to the table.” said OPM Director Katherine Archuleta.

    She added: “Since President Obama issued his Executive Order in 2010, we’ve made substantial progress in hiring and retaining people with disabilities over the past three years. This work is enabling the federal government to continue to develop as a model employer for people with disabilities.”

    According to the “Employing People with Disabilities in the Federal Executive Branch” report:

    • In FY 2012, federal employees with disabilities represented 11.89 percent of the overall workforce, including veterans who are 30 percent or more disabled.
    • 16.31% of new hires in FY 2012 were people with disabilities (up from 14.65% in FY 2011).
    • Additionally, 14.65% of General Schedule grade 14 and 15 new hires in FY 2012 were people with disabilities (up from 12.24% in FY 2011).

    On July 26, 2010, President Barack Obama issued Executive Order 13548 – Increasing Federal Employment of Individuals with Disabilities, in which he stated that the federal government must become a model for the employment of individuals with disabilities.

    OPM is responsible for providing regular reports to the President, the heads of agencies, and the public on the progress of Federal employment for people with disabilities. The report is prepared in compliance with Executive Order 13548 – Increasing Federal Employment of Individuals with Disabilities, and contains information on the representation of people with disabilities within the Federal Government and best practices of Federal agencies.

  • #181199

    David B. Grinberg
    Participant

    FYI: The full text of the report is available via clicking the link at the bottom of the OPM press release.

  • #181197

    Terrence Hill
    Participant

    I firmly believe that initiatives like the Telework program will help agencies to hire more people with disabilities. In fact, I recently read about an IRS Call Center that hired a number of severely disabled employees. Great example of a win-win, that actually resulted in a better result for the customer – tax payers.

  • #181195

    David B. Grinberg
    Participant

    That’s an excellent point, Terry, thanks for the comment.

    Telework can make good business sense as a reasonable accommodation for applicants and federal employees with disabilities — albeit depending on the person’s specific impairment(s) and job situation.

    Telework can be a critically important tool to help boost recruitment, hiring and advancement of individuals with disabilities within the federal workforce.

    EEOC has an informative fact sheet (guidance) on telework as a reasonable accommodation. The document explains “the important role telework can have for expanding employment opportunities for persons with disabilities.” It points out that:

    • “Not all persons with disabilities need – or want – to work at home. And not all jobs can be performed at home. But, allowing an employee to work at home may be a reasonable accommodation where the person’s disability prevents successfully performing the job on-site and the job, or parts of the job, can be performed at home without causing significant difficulty or expense.”

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