GovLoop Rankings

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This topic contains 21 replies, has 13 voices, and was last updated by  Patrick Quinn 7 years, 7 months ago.

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  • #98597

    John Moore
    Participant

    Hey everyone, curious to hear your perspective on rankings on govloop, and on communities in general. How much do they motivate you to contribute, to be part of the conversation?

    For example, I just saw my ranking change to Renowned….. Is that code for Talks too much πŸ™‚

    Curious to hear your thoughts.

    John

  • #98639

    Patrick Quinn
    Participant

    I’m a community manager myself, and I find that rankings (or thumbs-ups, or +1s or whatever) are most useful as landmarks for new members; they offer newcomers a little insight into the people w/ whom they’re interacting.

    Rankings probably have some initial effect on contribution rates, but I think community response is a much bigger driver. If someone posts a contribution and generates a response, they’re much more likely to post another. If they post a contribution and receive little or no response, they’re less likely to contribute again.

  • #98637

    John Moore
    Participant

    Thanks for the feedback Patrick, great info. How large, roughly, is the community that you manage?

  • #98635

    Patrick Quinn
    Participant

    We’re small, about 950 total.

  • #98633

    Matthew Hall
    Participant

    It is probably the key factor early on that kept me coming back here. Without it, I would have certainly quit. I would be dissappointed if it was taken away.

    I would however like to have more specific immediate feedback about how my ranking was effected by what I just did. e.g. how many points do I get for posting this comment?

  • #98631

    Nina Adrianna
    Participant

    For me, it’s irrelevant. But, I acknowledge that for a lot of people it’s a motivating factor.

  • #98629

    Srinidhi Boray
    Participant

    Although OpenGov resonates with me. From the the product being catalytic it seems only a mere fraction, i.e 0.01 percent of 2 million Fed employees have found motivation to get into the social networking particularly on govloop. On the contrary many of them are very active on Facebook, since it has had higher hits than google. There is something that keeps them away from govloop.

  • #98627

    Amanda Blount
    Participant

    HI Matthew,

    Look under your ranking and all the points for each item is listed. Everything gets points, including uploading photos, creating blogs, and everything else! πŸ™‚

    Amanda

  • #98625

    Amanda Blount
    Participant

    When I first started I commented how incredibly smart it was to include the rankings (and I still agree with that). I think as a community full of A type personalities it is fun to see your ranking go up and become a person others go to when they need help. I love it! many people love to have feedback about what they do. It is the same concept as that electronic green tree on the new green cars. The better you drive the bigger your tree grows.

    I read once where one of the social networks (I think it is facebook) was going to put feedback about how you treat your “friends”. Your friends would have little codes to show if you treated them well, or if you never talked to them. It was feedback many people wanted, but I have not seen it yet.

    PLUS, as a Community Greeter and Leader, the rankings give me immediate feedback about how well I am doing my volunteer job. I try to get 100 points, or more, a week. If I don’t get that many, then I know I am not doing a good volunteer service to Steve and Andy. So, at first, I used it as kind of a fun game to earn points by doing all kinds of things (just like any game that gives you points to do something), now I use it as a gauge to keep me on track.

    BTW – if we all did not “talk to much” there would be no Govloop! LOL

  • #98623

    Steve Ressler
    Keymaster

    For me personally, it is always useful as a curiosity. I like the GovLoop rankings even if they aren’t 100% perfect, it does show the key members that are amazing.

    On Twitter, the rankings that other sites create like WeFollow and others….are a fun curiosity. It’s fun to see getting new followers and where you fit in.

  • #98621

    Adriel Hampton
    Participant

    I’m highly motivated by the rankings. Rat in a maze.

  • #98619

    John Moore
    Participant

    Me too, to be honest. My goal was to reach the top 100, seeing your name in lights, you know. πŸ™‚ What I have found though, is once I reached that stage, the importance of the points were lessened.

    Now, I have done a lot of research in this space and haven’t found a system that works perfectly, but I am beginning to see the need for a more dynamic scoring system, something that matches individual user needs as well as community needs. More to consider, but this feels like a powerful next step in the scoring system for communities….

    Thoughts?

    John

  • #98617

    Trevor Reaske
    Participant

    I really like the ranking system here. It encourages people to participate that might not have otherwise. We have a pretty good competition going here in the office to see who can get the most points.

  • #98615

    John Moore
    Participant

    Trevor, who’s leading in your office? πŸ™‚

  • #98613

    Trevor Reaske
    Participant

    I happy to report that it is me right now! We are definitely trying to encourage other people to catch up though.

  • #98611

    Sam Allgood
    Participant

    I first became interested in the rankings when someone friended me and I noticed that his points quickly surpassed mine, so sorta got more involved in posting to keep up and compete with him. I have tracked myself going up and find it somewhat motivational, but am much more interested in posting useful info and comments. I would like to see it enhanced with a comments/blog/discussion ‘like’ or rating system because that shows more realistically how people respond to what you post rather than ranking primarily by amount of activity.

  • #98609

    I’ll be honest – it was pretty sweet to rise through the ranks over time as I contributed more to the community. But the points weren’t the primary driver. They were simply one measure of my level of activity and it was cool to be featured for the effort and engagement.

    Amanda made a great point a couple weeks back – points are very useful for knowing the likelihood of someone getting back to you when you reach out to them, too. If a member has no points, it could be an indication that they aren’t active here…and that you may need to try another communication channel to reach them.

    AND I’m gonna catch Henry Brown this week if it’s the LAST thing I do… πŸ˜‰

  • #98607

    John Moore
    Participant

    Great feedback Andy. Writing my blog pos tonight on reward systems and will tie in many of the great points that all of you have shared.

  • #98605

    John Moore
    Participant

    My post, which reflects just a few of my thoughts on the subject, can be found on my blog at:

    http://johnfmoore.wordpress.com/2010/04/27/community-reward-systems-need-more-flexibility/

  • #98603

    Christina Morrison
    Participant

    I personally like the rankings and would be sorry to see them go away. It’s a great way to identify people who are active on the site. Plus as a few of you have said, I’m working towards the goal of the Top 100!

  • #98601

    John Moore
    Participant

    Thanks Christina. I’ll have to look at the latest rankings as I have to believe you’re coming up fast.

    John

  • #98599

    Ari Herzog
    Member

    Ditto. I find the things meaningless.

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