Lost Cell Phone Project

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This topic contains 1 reply, has 1 voice, and was last updated by  Corey McCarren 5 years, 8 months ago.

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  • #157952

    Henry Brown
    Participant

    Interesting numbers! Although I suspect would be rather easy to change the results depending on where you left them…

    From Digital Life:

    What would you do if you found a smartphone on the subway or at a coffee shop? If you’re like most Americans, you’d rummage through the phone looking for photos, emails and even private banking information. And the chances are only 50-50 that you would try to return the phone.

    Computer security firm Symantec Corp. recently conducted an elaborate, first-of-its-kind study on lost smartphones and shared the results exclusively with TODAY and msnbc.com. The company set a trap for human nature, then sat back and watched. The results were not pretty.

    Symantec researchers intentionally lost 50 smartphones in cities around the U.S. and in Canada. They were left on newspaper boxes, park benches, elevators and other places that passers-by would quickly spot them. But these weren’t just any phones — they were loaded with tracking and logging software so Symantec employees could physically track them and keep track of everything the finders did with the gadgets.

    To spice up the test, the phones had an obvious file named “contacts,” making it easy for any finder to connect with the phone’s rightful owner. But the phones also offered tempting files, with names like “banking information,” and “HR files.”

  • #157954

    Corey McCarren
    Participant

    I’m glad to be able to say that I’ve found lost phones and have just returned them without looking at the peoples info (though I could see how HR files would be tempting, especially after the blog about performance review reports!). Losing your phone can be very dangerous. I think a lot of people probably have more personal information on their smartphones than any other device. Luckily they can be turned into bricks by calling cell providers.

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