On-Camera Screw Ups

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This topic contains 3 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  Steve Ressler 4 years, 2 months ago.

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  • #182558

    Thomas A Brazelton
    Participant

    Our department is about to undergo some media training for our department heads and I was wondering if anyone out there had access to clips of on-camera screw ups that we can use as examples of what NOT to do.

    We’re thinking about officials who disclosed too much information, stuttered or stammered during an interview or who were combative/aggressive with a reporter.

    I appreciate any insights you have!

  • #182564

    Steve Ressler
    Keymaster

    That’s fun training. Definitely feel like YouTube is a goldmine for you – I’ve seen quite a few local news errors that go YouTube viral

  • #182562

    Alan L. Greenberg
    Participant

    I’m retired now and I can’t say I was the greatest when dealing with the media. I dealt more with print media and off-camera TV investigative reporters. I’ll relate two anecdotes as advice.

    I had a habit of writing tongue-in-cheek commentary in the margins of correspondence. One of my pungent comments was picked up in a document which was part of a FOIA request. It ended up on national TV. Very embarrassing. Remember that anything on paper can conceivably be a public document.

    The other incident concerned an extensive interview by a rather flighty reporter. I happened to make what I thought was humorous comment after the interview which was just marginally related to the subject matter. That ended up as the only quote she used. Also embarrassing. Remember that an investigative reporter is not your friend no matter how charming they can be. Also, everything that you say is “on the record.”

    For more pithy commentary check the link to my blogs on my website.http://www.thegovernmentman.com

  • #182560

    David B. Grinberg
    Participant

    Just an FYI that sometimes one needs to be “combative and “aggressive” with reporters, depending on the specific situation. For example, if a reporter consistently asks questions which are overtly biased, have an inaccurate premise, or which were previously agreed to be off limits. Just something to consider for your training.

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