Should government better utilize libraries to engage citizens both conventionally and electronically?

Home Forums Citizen Engagement & Customer Service Should government better utilize libraries to engage citizens both conventionally and electronically?

This topic contains 5 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by  Stephen Peteritas 5 years, 11 months ago.

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  • #148972

    Daniel Bevarly
    Participant

    In a recent blog post, I discussed the potential for local libraries to serve as the public engagement centers for local, state and federal governments. I posted a link to the post on the LinkedIn Group “Gov 2.0” and it is receiving some thoughtful comments. If this topic interests to you, please join the discussion: Should government better utilize libraries to engage citizens both conventionally and electronically? Cheers, Dan Bevarly

  • #148982

    Stephen Peteritas
    Participant

    I really think that they should I was just up on Cape Cod over the holiday and the library there is VERY well funded and as such it is a hub of the community.

  • #148980

    Great discussion, Dan – what I said over on LinkedIn:

    I wrote about this subject a couple years ago under the title “Libraries as Linchpins of Gov 2.0 and Open Gov” –https://www.govloop.com/profiles/blogs/libraries-as-linchpins-of
    The blog post really just sets up the conversation. The comments on that piece are where the real gems are found… 🙂 Highly complementary and relevant to this discussion.

  • #148978

    Stacy Rapp
    Participant

    I think that’s a great idea. I love going to the library :0) It’s probably because I am frugal and don’t have to pay for the books or documentaries that I borrow, but it’s an excellent resource for all citizens in a community if they choose to use it. If there was something of interest going on with the local community, I would think the library would certainly generate a pool of people that might not otherwise attend. Especially since so many people don’t engage in politics or really even pay attention to the fact that they can have a voice in their local community (myself included for that matter). This would create a better public awareness I would think.

  • #148976

    Daniel Bevarly
    Participant

    Andrew – Thank you for sharing the link. I enjoyed your post and agree the comments are excellent and highly recommend others to review them. They also contain some great links to reports and other web sites for additional information and insight on this topic.

  • #148974

    Terrence Hill
    Participant

    Not sure about the Federal government, but I notice that libraries that have evolved are very popular gathering places. In order to ensure their survival in tough economic times, libraries have had to join the “e-Reader” revolution, serve as a “hot-spot” for web users, a computer lab for those without access to personal computers, a meeting place for public officials and constituents, an after-school gathering place for students, and the center of activity for communities. In the future, I can see libraries transforming into community centers with co-working facilities, adult classrooms, web-broadcasting and recording facilities, a new gathering place now that most bookstores have closed, and the co-habitating space for remote workers.

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