Social media is a two-way street

Home Forums Miscellaneous Social media is a two-way street

This topic contains 6 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  Bill Brantley 7 years, 5 months ago.

  • Author
    Posts
  • #111784

    Re-posted from the ChatterBachs blog:

    Social media is a two-way street. If it’s treated merely as a platform for pushing the organization’s agenda, you’re missing the point
    and the real value of social media. If you’re not listening, you”re not
    truly connecting with your customers.

    Let’s look at Twitter. A few impressions (not scientific, mind you, but observations nonetheless) from my own experience…

    First, if I see an account’s Twitter feed that’s only filled with their announcements, press releases, or company news, I wonder about
    their commitment to the social media platform. It also leaves me
    wondering about their commitment to their customers. If I don’t see
    retweets, replies, or mentions, I question their engagement. If they’re
    not interested in assisting others in a virtual environment, how much
    are they really willing to assist in person, over the phone, or via
    email?

    Furthermore, unless you’re famous (and I mean really famous), most people are not going want to follow your Twitter account unless you’re
    following them back. When I find an account that has too low of a
    follower to following ratio, I wonder if it’s legitimate (particularly
    when there may be no avatar/profile photo, customized background, and/or
    fewer than 20 tweets). However, when I see an account that has far too
    high of a follower to following ratio, it leaves me with the equally
    dangerous impression that perhaps they’re thinking too much about
    themselves and not enough about their customers (or potential
    customers). I’m less likely to follow; and thus, less likely to list.
    For those of you who may be new to this, listing on Twitter is a way to
    categorize; it’s also a way to give a nod to those who are your
    favorites or you get valuable information from.

    Social media should make you more accessible and transparent. Social media should make you more responsive, but it still takes
    people. You see… social media doesn’t just automatically transform
    organizations; social media is a reflection or extension of what is
    already there. And, if you don’t like what you’re seeing from the
    mirror of social media, perhaps it’s time to change what’s being
    reflected and not time to buy a new mirror.

  • #111797

    Bill Brantley
    Participant

    Great advice! And the research backs you on the effect of Twitter - http://www.readwriteweb.com/archives/study_twitter_isnt_very_social.php

  • #111795

    Elliot Volkman
    Participant

    Jay you hit a lot of important points here. Especially in the area of followers. Sadly it's become common that having a higher follow list than followers looks poorly upon that account. While you can place organizations and RSS type twitter users in a lost, reducing your following number, it still makes it slightly more difficult to pay attention to them constantly.

  • #111793

    Amy Adams
    Participant

    I think many organizations make the mistake of equating social media as the new press release. As the voice of my organization's Facebook, Twitter and YouTube channels we regularly respond to questions and comments -- including some quite rude comments to our YouTube videos. I found that by responding to people's concerns I get very supportive comments from those people in the future.

    I think people are genuinely surprised that actual humans live behind government sites. Nice humans!

  • #111791

    Bill, thanks for the feedback and for the link. I re-posted that article elsewhere.

  • #111789

    Thanks for weighing in, Elliot. I routinely go back and clear out many (not all) who don't follow back. As I do this, I think they wasted an opportunity for another set of ears, a customer, and/or a potential champion for their blog, product, or cause. They're also lost the possibility of mentions and retweets from an engaged account with a significant number of followers. I think your point also begs the question... how many RSS feeds can one reasonably follow? I know the number has to be much lower than the number of Twitter accounts one can follow.

  • #111787

    Good morning, Amy. Thanks for your comments and insights. Glad to see that you are providing the interaction and engagement that social media warrants. This definitely wins friends, fans, and followers!

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.