What do you do with your SF 52s?

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This topic contains 10 replies, has 7 voices, and was last updated by  Doris Tirone 5 years, 9 months ago.

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  • #154637

    Steve Ressler
    Keymaster

    I was cleaning up my office the other day and ran into a folder of my old SF 52s as well as certificates from training courses that I took

    I was thinking it would be great to have these either in an electronic format or stored somewhere online.

    But curious – what do others do with their SF 52s or training certificates? Anyone use a cool solution other than the paper folders?

  • #154657

    Doris Tirone
    Participant

    SF52’s are valuable, proof-of-service documents and can be useful in the future for many reasons (e.g., missing social security credits, supporting evidence of long-term Details, to establish a chrono list of Federal service, etc.). Although these document may one day find their way to the “ROC” (OPM’s Retirement Operations Center) or to the St. Louis records depository (if one leaves federal employment before retirement) , I would not count on either of those depositories to produce copies of these documents, if you need them in the future. Recall (e.g.) that the St. Louis Records Center once burned down and many records were completely lost. If your SF52’s are electronic, I’d store them in some type of electronic file (e.g., a thumb drive). If you have hard copy documents and you’re able to have them digitized, I’d have them scanned and added to that electronic file. You may also want to consider “burning” your SF-52’s onto a R/W CD-ROM. If you have only the hard copy option available to you, I’d suggest preserving them in some type of acid-resistent sleeve used for archival purposes. This may seem like “over kill” but believe me, these may be one-of-a-kind documents one day and I think they should be safeguarded!

  • #154655

    Terrence Hill
    Participant

    One of my previous assignments was to implement the eOPF (electronic Official Personnel Folder). Since then employees no longer receive paper SF-52s. They are automatically loaded via a feed from the National Finance Center (NFC). Before they resign/retire/transfer, I recommend that all employees log into their eOPF and download their eOPF. It downloads as a big .pdf file that can be saved for future reference. This file should include the last 3 performance appraisals and all the benefits forms. For training records, I recommend going into the learning management system (LMS) and downloading the transcript. No need to keep paper copies of any document.

  • #154653

    Dora Porter
    Participant

    Most of mine have been added to my eOPF. Those that have not been added I have scanned and put them on my computer at home and on a flash drive.

  • #154651

    Steve Ressler
    Keymaster

    Very cool – what year did this happen? Any way to go back into NFC know after a person transfers out?

  • #154649

    Doris Tirone
    Participant

    I’d say the transition to eOPF began around 2008. The implementation date depends on the Agency at which one’s record was held at the time. But, records already archived at the St. Louis NPRC were probably not digitized.

  • #154647

    Peter Sperry
    Participant

    Make sure you have an hard copy version as well as electronic and store the more important ones (proof of service, promotion etc) in a fireproof lockbox. Imagine you are in an OPM office in 30 years trying to establish or correct a retirement claim with your 2010 era elctronic SF-52 stored in a PDF format that became obsolete in 2020 on thumb drive they stopped making connectors for in 2030. The person next to you has paper documents. Who will get their claim processed more quickly?

  • #154645

    Terrence Hill
    Participant

    That’s right – each agency implemented eOPF between 2007 and 2012. I’m thinking that by now everyone is using the eOPF. Most agencies actualy took the effort to scan, index, and include all legacy documents that were in the paper OPF at the time. Going forward, these documents were never printed, filed, or mailed, saving millions of dollars in labor each year, not to mention storage space, mailing costs, etc. This was one of my proudest achievements that I can say was a success, not only for my agency, but for all agencies.

  • #154643

    Steve Ressler
    Keymaster

    That is a huge achievement. It’s easy to say – we should just move all that paper online. It’s much harder to actually execute and deliver. That’s awesome

  • #154641

    steve muir
    Participant

    Just a couple quick comments – the SF-52 was used “back in the day” to document prsonnl actions which are actually your SF-50 and those are very important documents. They were filed on the left had side of the OPF to show who “authorized” the action.

    e-OPF – I was involved in the e original Beta project at HHS (the first cabinet dept to go “electronic”) some years ago and it was not just going fwd – everything was scanned including “onion skin” copies of 1950 and 60 era SF-50’s. Not all agencies are “Live” yet and OPM an NARA have lots of work to do as they eventually “own” the records before agencies can eliminate the paper copies of some documts.

  • #154639

    Julie Chase
    Participant

    I have a drawer in my file cabinet at work with 8 yrs worth of training certificates. We just completed our ORM training online, I save a copy to .pdf (I am one of the few in the office that has Adobe Pro). I print a copy for our organizations training coordinator and she files it in her “training files”, along with everyone elses. The WG’s go to “classroom training” at the training building because they don’t have access to a computer and some senior WG’s are not computer literate. After the class they get a ceritificate to bring back. They will make a copy and give the copy to the training coordinator and keep their paper copy. Some of them still do not use MyPay…because they want that “paper” copy. I email mine home and then I put them on a thumb drive at home. I burn the ones at work on a disk, because we are forbidden to use thumbdrives.

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