Where do you get your local news?

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This topic contains 18 replies, has 14 voices, and was last updated by  Jerry Schmidt 7 years ago.

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  • #167112

    Emily Landsman
    Participant

    When I was about 12 years old, I convinced my parents that we needed to receive both Newsday and the New York Times. The Times covered the world, but Newsday had our local Long Island news. I loved reading both, noting the quality of the written pieces in each paper.

    As we’ve all heard for several years now, local papers are disappearing. Reporters are being replaced by shared news service stories. Local information and stories are being pushed to the last pages of print media and are given less and less space.

    Please share your thoughts. Some questions to ponder….Have you seen changes to your local paper? Where & how do you get your local news? Do you feel a general decline in the quality of news reporting in spite of all the new media tools at our disposal?

  • #167148

    Jerry Schmidt
    Participant

    Emily,

    Our local paper quit printing in our town (Topeka) and is now being printed in Kansas City. The reporting is as thorough as a medium market paper can be, but they have to rely on “stringers” and wire services because there just aren’t enough of them around. The quality of stories has declined, in my opinion; they don’t seem to be doing as much in-depth reporting of certain issues (state budgets, drought, cuts in social services) or if they do it’s usually after the fact.

    My biggest beef is with the local television stations. They are very sloppy in their use of full screens and very technically sloppy. It just feels like they don’t care; you are going to watch because “Wheel of Fortune” is on next.

  • #167146

    Jack Hernandez
    Participant

    Local news … interesting that with the advent of social media and instant info, the world (as far as news is concerned) has become a huge “local” hub. With a handful of media giants controlling the airwaves and effectively controlling what we see, I’m not surprised at the declining quality of news especially on television. The shrinking traditional media, I always felt, acted as a method of checks and balances. Without those smaller publishers and media outlets, there’s less competitiveness and therefore, less worry to produce a better product.

    The internet and social media has opened the flood-gates for all types of news — from amateur reporting by some guy with an iphone to special interest outlets reporting news catered to their specific audience. I feel it’s more dangerous than beneficial, and the concentration of misinformation is greater than ever before, especially since their is nothing on the web to regulate such information. On the other hand, a site that proves its credibility through time and legitimate reporting can carve a niche on cyberspace.

  • #167144

    Jeff S
    Participant

    Local newspaper websites

  • #167142

    Kenneth Wells
    Participant

    I get most of my local news from television. The newscasts from the various stations keep me informed of what is happening in my area. I also get my local news from the Washington Post, and other newspapers.

  • #167140

    Samuel Lovett
    Participant

    Google Alerts (delivered once a day) are my prime method of sifting though the local news I want to read

  • #167138

    Chris Cairns
    Participant

    Google News local filter.

  • #167136

    Dave Uejio
    Participant

    Google RSS feed for the Gazette, and Twitter for my favorite local reporters, like @ChadwickMelissa

  • #167134

    David B. Grinberg
    Participant

    I get my local news from TV, print and online media outlets, including: Washington, D.C.-area TV network news affiliates, the Washington Post, the Montgomery Journal and the News-Gazette (both of Montgomery County, Maryland), as well as Bethesda Magazine and the Washingtonian magazine. I also get local news via Google News.

  • #167132

    Steve Ressler
    Keymaster

    Yes, I still read the paper…the web version as well. In addition, to the blogs because I love reading the comment section. I think that’s the best part. There are some days I am laughing hysterically at the stuff people write for everyone to see! In addition, I also read about local news overseas. There is one particular website in the U.K. and the news will break there first and than over here.

  • #167130

    Emily Landsman
    Participant

    Jeff, have you seen less local coverage over the last few years? Does your local paper still have a print version also?

  • #167128

    Emily Landsman
    Participant

    Jennifer, do you notice a change in local coverage? More stories online than in print or are they the same? What’s the coverage of local news (vs national or international) like in other counties? I love some of the local news blogs here in Arlington, VA!

  • #167126

    Steve Ressler
    Keymaster

    Hi Emily –

    Sorry I was so late getting back to you. There are more stories online than in print because you can produce more than in print. There is such a quick turnaround. Let me also disclose that I used to work in publishing so I understand the model. Re: the coverage of the local news I keep up with the ones from my relatives area e.g. Oklahoma and the surrounding areas and here in the Washington, DC area. What’s different is POV and the forest, the trees and the weeds. So the local will give you the weeds and the national and international will give you the forest and the trees sort of the strategic POV.

  • #167124

    Steve Ressler
    Keymaster

    Local TV but I’ve been getting into my local Patch (owned by AOL) which has hyper local news

  • #167122

    Jeff S
    Participant

    Not sure I am seeing less if anything sometimes it seems like more. Yes the print version seems to subsist as a holder for Sunday coupons since that is when I generally purchase the hardcopy. I am also a midwest transplant as well and read my hometown newspapers online most everyday as well.

  • #167120

    Joe Williams
    Participant

    I get my community’s local news through Twitter, directing to articles posted on various local news websites. I also follow a handful of local reporters who tweet additional human-interest and behind-the-scenes information not always available on the websites.

  • #167118

    David Dejewski
    Participant

    Years ago I handled classified information. I was plugged in to what was really going on in the world. I stopped paying attention to the big national news networks (I prefer a theater ticket and popcorn when I’m going to watch a show). From today’s headlines:

    R U Serious!?

    I find local news to be much more relevant, interesting, honest, and verifiable. In the real estate business local news is infinitely more important than national or even regional news. The more local, the better. It’s so important, in fact, that we plug into local news outlets as a regular part of our due diligence in a given market. I even make contact with local reporters when I see one that’s regularly covering topics I’m interested in.

    Most local newspapers have some sort of electronic mailing list that readers can subscribe to. I am subscribed to local newspapers in markets where I own investment properties.

  • #167116

    Emily Landsman
    Participant

    Hope folks are still following this thread…just read this piece about upset over less frequent printing of the New Orleans Times-Picayune, among other papers, and the move towards online news. http://www.poynter.org/latest-news/mediawire/183922/newhouse-theres-every-reason-to-be-upset-and-angry-but/

  • #167114

    Daniel Bevarly
    Participant

    Emily – Pew found that newspapers are still the primary information source for adult Americans. This may provide additional insight into your question. I pulled this content from a blog post of mine: “Why it’s important to know how people learn about their community.”

    Did you know that local TV news is still the most popular source for local information in America? However, adults rely on it primarily for just three subjects: weather, breaking news and at a distant third, traffic. And that shrinking newspaper at the end of your driveway each morning is still the primary information source adult Americans turn to for a wider range of topics than any other.

    These are some of the findings of a new study produced by the Pew Research Center’s Project for Excellent in Journalism and the Pew Internet & American Life Project in partnership with the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation. The survey looks at how people learn about their community by breaking down local information into 16 key topic areas. The full report is an interesting read for a number of reasons. One finding is how the adult community, when divided between 18-39 year olds, and adults aged 40 and over is almost an inverse relationship between these two groups about how they use traditional information sources such as television and newspapers and the Internet. The report also provides some important insight into the possible future for these sources and the impact they have and will have on the citizenry.

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