Posts Tagged: management

The Guide – Helping the New Administration Succeed in Washington

This is a short and to the point document that focuses on management in Washington. Here are the first two paragraphs of the 11 page document. The transition from campaign to governing requires that presidential policies be transformed from rhetoric into an actionable agenda and then into concrete results. Neither good policies nor sound investmentsRead… Read more »

To blog or not – let’s try an experiment

Hello there! Thanks for reading my first-ever blog post on my own, as opposed to writing for EPA’s blog, Greenversations. I’m pretty active on Twitter @levyj413, talking about social media (aka Web 2.0) and esp. social media in gov’t, but I’ve never blogged in a normal-length format. I’m enthusiastically learning and exploring various social mediaRead… Read more »

Performance Plus and Social media

We had a great performance management event last Friday, sponsored by the IDeA and the Local Authority Research Councils Initiative. There was a great line-up of speakers who covered everything from the academic theoretical side of performance management to the nuts and bolts of systems thinking to rubbish collection and disposal in Northern Ireland. ThisRead… Read more »

Great discussions happening here on management and governance!

It’s topical all over it seems. And the bane of my existence 😉 There are some great discussions happening on how to manage the web – what teams are there invovled, who does what, and why, and what works and what doesn’t. It’s one I’m keen on watching, so I’d like to see what othersRead… Read more »

Rule # 5: Correcting a subordinate’s work product can either be demeaning or educational based on style and number of occurrences.

Rule number 5 is closely related to rule number 4 both having to do with empowering employees. While rule 4 has to with decision-making, rule 5 deals with written work products. All large organizations are document driven (they may be paperless but they still have electronic documents) which have a number of purposes, most importantlyRead… Read more »

Rule #4: Little Transfer of skills or knowledge occurs when the boss makes all the decisions.

Most individuals’ rise within an organization based on their proven track record; that is after all the basis of “merit promotion”. Therefore, most first line managers are selected based on their technical skill and often succeed in their first management position by exercising their superior technical knowledge rather then developing management skills. My own experienceRead… Read more »

Rule# 3: On a Personal Level, never ask a subordinate to do anything you wouldn’t ask of a peer or boss

In the past, most managers above a certain level had a secretary who performed a variety of tasks such as typing, taking dictation, controlling access and calendar, making travel arrangements, and a variety of other mundane tasks that improved the efficiency of the manager. In the best of situations the boss and secretary became aRead… Read more »

Rule #2: “Honesty is measured by telling the boss what he/she needs to hear not by whether you keep your hand out of the cookie jar”

Rule #2: “Honesty is measured by telling the boss what he/she needs to hear not by whether you keep your hand out of the cookie jar” The vast majority of employees in the workplace can be trusted to deal honestly with money and materials (yes I know everyone has the experience of someone constantly violatingRead… Read more »