How Enterprise 2.0 is Like a Get Rich Quick Scheme

  • A pencil can be used to write, as a test of manhood (a first grader showing how strong he is by breaking it), and as a murder weapon (I have never seen this, but I am sure it could happen).
  • A book can be used to enlighten, kill a cockroach or as fuel for a fire.
  • A campfire can be used to cook, to get warm or as a stage for pyrotechnics.

The point? It depends on how you use your tools.

And I am afraid Enterprise 2.0 will be used more and more as a “Get Rich Quick” scheme.

Training has. When I first started training I quickly found that managers, in an attempt to increase the performance of their employees, would ask that a training course be created so their employees would know what to do. I would diligently do what they asked, but it never made it quite right. Eventually I learned that a manager who wants training is not a good enough reason to give it to them. There are often better alternatives to increased performance.

Why did they turn to training so often? They were lazy. They didn’t want to put in the effort to 1) analyze what is really happening, 2) to find an appropriate solution and 3) execute on that. All of that took too much time and they had things to do – training was a simple answer.

Enterprise 2.0 is starting to go that way. ”Just create a community and all will be well.” ”Put it out there on (tool’s name) and someone will figure it out.” These and many others are starting to creep in as possible solutions.

Creating a community that functions well is not a walk in the park. Yet many are hoping it will be: Give very little for a big return. Sounds like they are using E2.0 as a “Get Rich Quick” scheme to me.

If we are going to do it, let’s do it the correct way instead of taking the shortcut.

(This is a crosspost from Engaged Learning)

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Profile Photo Stephen Peteritas

I think some people do view it the way you suggest but in the end I don’t think they’ll actually “get rich quick” off of it. Putting together a community that is actually worth a crap is incredibly difficult to do.