Posts Tagged: PACER

Lee: What Gets Redacted in Pacer?

Timothy B. Lee of the Princeton University Department of Computer Science and Center for Information Technology Policy (CITP) has posted What Gets Redacted in Pacer?, on the CITP’s blog, Freedom to Tinker. In this post, Mr. Lee reports on research respecting documents from the U.S. federal courts’ PACER database. Using customized software, Mr. Lee —… Read more »

Lee on Redaction Failures in PACER

Timothy B. Lee of the Princeton University Department of Computer Science and Center for Information Technology Policy (CITP) has posted Studying the Frequency of Redaction Failures in PACER, on the CITP’s blog, Freedom to Tinker. In this post, Mr. Lee reports on research respecting documents from the U.S. federal courts’ PACER database. Using customized software,… Read more »

Accessing PACER Cases Free of Charge

A procedure for accessing full text judicial decisions free of charge on PACER — the U.S. federal courts’ database of court decisions and litigation materials — has been posted by Mark Rosch. The procedure has been recently discussed by Nick Moline of Justia. Oddly, this procedure does not seem to be mentioned in the FAQ… Read more »

Katz on Quantitative Legal Prediction

Daniel Martin Katz, of the University of Michigan’s Center for the Study of Complex Systems and Computational Legal Studies, has posted Quantitative Legal Prediction, slides from his presentation at NELIC 2011: The New and Emerging Legal Infrastructures Conference, held 15 April 2011 at Boalt Hall, Berkeley, California, USA. The presentation describes a model for the… Read more »

Schultze on PACER, RECAP, and the Movement to Free American Case Law

Stephen Schultze of Princeton’s Center for Information Technology Policy has posted PACER, RECAP, and the Movement to Free American Case Law, on the VoxPopuLII Blog, published by the Legal Information Institute at Cornell University Law School. In this post, Mr. Schultze describes the origins of RECAP, an innovative project to publicly disseminate U.S. federal court… Read more »

Yu on Bringing Open Government to Courts

An interview has been posted with Harlan Yu of the Princeton University Center for Information Technology Policy (CITP), about the development of RECAP, the controversy over charging fees for access to court records through PACER, privacy respecting court records, the Law.gov legal open government data project, Mr. Yu’s Ph.D. research, and his presentation entitled Government… Read more »

National Broadband Plan Endorses Free Access to Law

Free online access to U.S. federal legal information has been recommended in the National Broadband Plan released by the U.S. Federal Communications Commission on March 16, 2010. The Plan’s recommendation 15.1 seems consistent with the principles of the Law.gov legal open government data movement: Recommendation 15.1: The primary legal documents of the federal government should… Read more »

Yu: Assessing PACER’s Access Barriers

Harlan Yu of the Princeton University Center for Information Technology Policy (CITP) has posted Assessing PACER’s Access Barriers, on the CITP blog Freedom to Tinker. Mr. Yu’s post assesses the preliminary report of a study of PACER by the U.S. federal courts, and described in the new issue of Third Branch. While that report indicates… Read more »

GovLaunch: The New RECAP Archive – Better Public Access to U.S. Federal Court Records

Stephen Schultze and Harlan Yu, both of the Princeton University Center for Information Technology Policy, today announced (here and here) the launching of The RECAP Archive, a new Web interface to RECAP, the free database of U.S. federal court documents. The RECAP Archive enables searching and browsing by court, case name, docket number, PACER case… Read more »

Video of 2010 Conference on Privacy and Public Access to Court Records

Video is now available of some programs from the 7th Conference on Privacy and Public Access to Court Records, held 4-5 March 2010 in Williamsburg, Virginia, USA. The posted programs are: Where Have We Been and Where Are We Going?; Some Emerging Issues in E-Filing and E-Privacy; and Public Electronic Access to Federal Court Records… Read more »