Posts Tagged: Retired

Ressler’s Rule # 8: You can’t always get what you want but if you try real hard you’ll get what you need (a nod to the “Rolling Stones”) Life tends to be a rocky and twisting road for most of us unless we were born “a fortunate son”. We don’t get the date with the… Read more »

Wisdom From Retired Fed – Rule #7 – Common Sense & Common Courtesy Are Uncommon

It’s been awhile since I last posted but this is Rule #7 in my series of tips I learned in my 35 years as a federal manager and SES at IRS. Rest of the tips are at the bottom ——- Ressler’s Rules #7: Common Sense and Common Courtesy are uncommon attributes and therefore highly prized…. Read more »

Healthcare reform and helping fellow feds in Haiti

By Dorothy Ramienski Internet Editor Federal News Radio Will healthcare reform affect you? A lot of federal employees are wondering whether or not healthcare reform will affect them. To answer that question, Senior Correspondent Mike Causey spoke with NARFE Legislative Specialist Sarah Holstine and NARFE Assistant Legislative Director Margaret Hostetler. How can you help fellow… Read more »

Rule # 5: Correcting a subordinate’s work product can either be demeaning or educational based on style and number of occurrences.

Rule number 5 is closely related to rule number 4 both having to do with empowering employees. While rule 4 has to with decision-making, rule 5 deals with written work products. All large organizations are document driven (they may be paperless but they still have electronic documents) which have a number of purposes, most importantly… Read more »

Rule #4: Little Transfer of skills or knowledge occurs when the boss makes all the decisions.

Most individuals’ rise within an organization based on their proven track record; that is after all the basis of “merit promotion”. Therefore, most first line managers are selected based on their technical skill and often succeed in their first management position by exercising their superior technical knowledge rather then developing management skills. My own experience… Read more »

Rule# 3: On a Personal Level, never ask a subordinate to do anything you wouldn’t ask of a peer or boss

In the past, most managers above a certain level had a secretary who performed a variety of tasks such as typing, taking dictation, controlling access and calendar, making travel arrangements, and a variety of other mundane tasks that improved the efficiency of the manager. In the best of situations the boss and secretary became a… Read more »

Rule #2: “Honesty is measured by telling the boss what he/she needs to hear not by whether you keep your hand out of the cookie jar”

Rule #2: “Honesty is measured by telling the boss what he/she needs to hear not by whether you keep your hand out of the cookie jar” The vast majority of employees in the workplace can be trusted to deal honestly with money and materials (yes I know everyone has the experience of someone constantly violating… Read more »

Rule #1: The test of ethical behavior is always “would your mother approve?”

Back in the 1980”s (you remember the 80’s-the “me generation”, big hair, bad rock and roll), institutions began to develop courses on ethical behavior in response to a perceived lack of ethical behavior in the workplace (venerable Harvard Law School placed an ethics course in their curriculum which generated more then a modest amount of… Read more »

Wisdom From a Retired Fed: A Practical Guide to Management

Management is (to paraphrase Casey Stengal) :”75% art and the other half is science” . To individuals entering the profession, managing can appear to be an endless minefield with potential disasters lurking at each step. Yet veteran managers often appear to subordinates as magicians able to generate optimum performance effortlessly. Over the next several weeks… Read more »